Getting Started

The quickest way to learn about Avalanche is to run a node and interact with the network.

In this tutorial (est. time: 10 minutes), we will:

  • Install and run an Avalanche node

  • Connect to Avalanche

  • Send AVAX

  • Add your node to the validator set

If your issue isn’t addressed in the FAQ, come ask for help in the Avalanche Discord! We will work to get you through any obstacles.

Requirements

Avalanche is an incredibly lightweight protocol, so the minimum computer requirements are quite modest.

  • Hardware: CPU > 2 GHz, RAM > 4 GB, Storage > 10 GB free space

  • OS: Ubuntu 18.04/20.04 or Mac OS X >= Catalina

  • Software: Go 1.15.5 or later

Run go version. It should be 1.15.5 or above. Run echo $GOPATH. It should not be empty.

This tutorial assumes you have enough AVAX (2,000 or more) to add a validator held under a mnemonic key phrase.

Run an Avalanche Node and Send Funds

Let’s install AvalancheGo, the Go implementation of an Avalanche node, and connect to the Avalanche Public Testnet.

Download AvalancheGo

The node is a binary program. You can either download the source code and then build the binary program, or you can download the pre-built binary. You can do either of the below. You don’t need to do both.

Source Code

Download the AvalancheGo repository:

go get -v -d github.com/ava-labs/avalanchego/...

Note to advanced users: AvalancheGo uses Go modules, so you can clone the AvalancheGo repository to locations other than your GOPATH.

Change to the avalanchego directory:

cd $GOPATH/src/github.com/ava-labs/avalanchego

Build AvalancheGo:

./scripts/build.sh

The binary, named avalanchego, is in avalanchego/build.

Binary

Go to our releases page, and select the release you want (probably the latest one.)

Under Assets, select the appropriate file.

For MacOS: Download: avalanche-osx-<VERSION>.zip Unzip: unzip avalanche-osx-<VERSION>.zip The resulting folder, avalanche-<VERSION>, contains the binaries. You can run the node with ./avalanche-<VERSION>/avalanchego

For Linux: Download: avalanche-linux-<VERSION>.tar.gz. Unzip: tar -xvf avalanche-linux-<VERSION>.tar.gz The resulting folder, avalanche-<VERSION>, contains the binaries. You can run the node with ./avalanche-<VERSION>/avalanchego

Start a Node, and Connect to Avalanche

If you built from source:

./build/avalanchego

If you are using the released binaries:

./avalanche-<VERSION>/avalanchego

If you want to be able to make API calls to your node from other machines, include argument --http-host= (e.g. ./build/avalanchego --http-host=)

You can use Ctrl + C to kill the node.

To connect to the Fuji Testnet instead, use argument --network-id=fuji. You can get funds on the Testnet from the faucet.

When the node starts, it has to bootstrap (catch up with the rest of the network). You will see logs about bootstrapping. When a given chain is done bootstrapping, it will print a log like this:

INFO [06-07|19:54:06] <X Chain> /snow/engine/avalanche/transitive.go#80: bootstrapping finished with 1 vertices in the accepted frontier

To check if a given chain is done bootstrapping, call info.isBootstrapped like so:

curl -X POST --data '{
"jsonrpc":"2.0",
"id" :1,
"method" :"info.isBootstrapped",
"params": {
"chain":"X"
}
}' -H 'content-type:application/json;' 127.0.0.1:9650/ext/info

If this returns true, the chain is bootstrapped. If you make an API call to a chain that is not done bootstrapping, it will return API call rejected because chain is not done bootstrapping. If your node never finishes bootstrapping, follow this FAQ, if you are still experiencing issues please contact us on Discord.

Create a Keystore User

Avalanche nodes provide a built-in Keystore. The Keystore manages users and is a lot like a wallet. A user is a password-protected identity that a client can use when interacting with blockchains. You should only create a keystore user on a node that you operate, as the node operator has access to your plaintext password. To create a user, call keystore.createUser:

curl -X POST --data '{
"jsonrpc": "2.0",
"id": 1,
"method": "keystore.createUser",
"params": {
"username": "YOUR USERNAME HERE",
"password": "YOUR PASSWORD HERE"
}
}' -H 'content-type:application/json;' 127.0.0.1:9650/ext/keystore

The response should be:

{
"jsonrpc":"2.0",
"result":{"success":true},
"id":1
}

Now, you have a user on this node. Keystore data exists at the node level. Users you create on one node’s Keystore do not exist on other nodes but you can import/export users to/from the Keystore. See the Keystore API to see how.

You should only keep a small amount of your funds on your node. Most of your funds should be secured by a mnemonic that is not saved to any computer.

Create an Address

Avalanche is a platform of heterogeneous blockchains, one of which is the X-Chain, which acts as a decentralized platform for creating and trading digital assets. We are now going to create an address to hold AVAX on our node.

To create a new address on the X-Chain, call avm.createAddress, a method of the X-Chain’s API:

curl -X POST --data '{
"jsonrpc":"2.0",
"id" :2,
"method" :"avm.createAddress",
"params" :{
"username":"YOUR USERNAME HERE",
"password":"YOUR PASSWORD HERE"
}
}' -H 'content-type:application/json;' 127.0.0.1:9650/ext/bc/X

If your node isn’t finished bootstrapping, this call will return status 503 with message API call rejected because chain is not done bootstrapping.

Note that we make this request to 127.0.0.1:9650/ext/bc/X. The bc/X portion signifies that the request is being sent to the blockchain whose ID (or alias) is X (i.e., the X-Chain).

The response should look like this:

{
"jsonrpc":"2.0",
"id":2,
"result" :{
"address":"X-avax1xeaj0h9uy7c5jn6fxjp0rg4g39jeh0hl27vf75"
}
}

Your user now controls the address X-avax1xeaj0h9uy7c5jn6fxjp0rg4g39jeh0hl27vf75 on the X-Chain. To tell apart addresses on different chains, the Avalanche convention is for an address to include the ID or alias of the chain it exists on. Hence, this address begins X-, denoting that it exists on the X-Chain.

Send Funds From Avalanche Wallet to Your Node

Note: the instructions below move real funds.

Let’s move funds from the Avalanche Wallet to your node.

Go to Avalanche Wallet. Click Access Wallet, then Mnemonic Key Phrase. Enter your mnemonic phrase.

Click the Send tab on the left. For amount, select, .002 AVAX. Enter the address of your node, then click Confirm.

We can check an address’s balance of a given asset by calling avm.getBalance, another method of the X-Chain’s API. Let’s check that the transfer went through:

curl -X POST --data '{
"jsonrpc":"2.0",
"id" :3,
"method" :"avm.getBalance",
"params" :{
"address":"X-avax1xeaj0h9uy7c5jn6fxjp0rg4g39jeh0hl27vf75",
"assetID" :"AVAX"
}
}' -H 'content-type:application/json;' 127.0.0.1:9650/ext/bc/X

Note that AVAX has the special ID AVAX. Usually an asset ID is an alphanumeric string.

The response should indicate that we have 2,000,000 nAVAX or 0.002 AVAX.

{
"jsonrpc":"2.0",
"id" :3,
"result" :{
"balance":2000000,
"utxoIDs": [
{
"txID": "x6vR85YPNRf5phpLAEC7Sd6Tq2PXWRt3AAHAK4BpjxyjRyhtu",
"outputIndex": 0
}
]
}
}

Send AVAX

Now, let’s send some AVAX by making an API call to our node:

curl -X POST --data '{
"jsonrpc":"2.0",
"id" :5,
"method" :"avm.send",
"params" :{
"assetID" :"AVAX",
"amount" :1000,
"to" :"X-avax1w4nt49gyv4e99ldqevy50l2kz55y9efghep0cs",
"changeAddr" :"X-avax1turszjwn05lflpewurw96rfrd3h6x8flgs5uf8",
"username" :"YOUR USERNAME HERE",
"password" :"YOUR PASSWORD HERE"
}
}' -H 'content-type:application/json;' 127.0.0.1:9650/ext/bc/X

amount specifies the number of nAVAX to send.

If you want to specify a particular address where change should go, you can specify it in changeAddr. You can leave this field empty; if you do, any change will go to one of the addresses your user controls.

In order to prevent spam, Avalanche requires the payment of a transaction fee. The transaction fee will be automatically deducted from an address controlled by your user when you issue a transaction. Keep that in mind when you’re checking balances below.

When you send this request, the node will authenticate you using your username and password. Then, it will look through all the private keys controlled by your user until it finds enough AVAX to satisfy the request.

The response contains the transaction’s ID. It will be different for every invocation of send.

{
"jsonrpc":"2.0",
"id" :5,
"result" :{
"txID":"2QouvFWUbjuySRxeX5xMbNCuAaKWfbk5FeEa2JmoF85RKLk2dD",
"changeAddr" :"X-avax1turszjwn05lflpewurw96rfrd3h6x8flgs5uf8"
}
}

Checking the Transaction Status

This transaction will only take a second or two to finalize. We can check its status with avm.getTxStatus:

curl -X POST --data '{
"jsonrpc":"2.0",
"id" :6,
"method" :"avm.getTxStatus",
"params" :{
"txID":"2QouvFWUbjuySRxeX5xMbNCuAaKWfbk5FeEa2JmoF85RKLk2dD"
}
}' -H 'content-type:application/json;' 127.0.0.1:9650/ext/bc/X

The response should indicate that the transaction was accepted:

{
"jsonrpc":"2.0",
"id" :6,
"result" :{
"status":"Accepted"
}
}

You might also see that status is Processing if the network has not yet finalized the transaction.

Once you see that the transaction is Accepted, check the balance of the to address to see that it has the AVAX we sent:

curl -X POST --data '{
"jsonrpc":"2.0",
"id" :7,
"method" :"avm.getBalance",
"params" :{
"address":"X-avax1w4nt49gyv4e99ldqevy50l2kz55y9efghep0cs",
"assetID" :"AVAX"
}
}' -H 'content-type:application/json;' 127.0.0.1:9650/ext/bc/X

The response should be:

{
"jsonrpc":"2.0",
"id" :7,
"result" :{
"balance":1000
}
}

In the same fashion, we could check X-avax1xeaj0h9uy7c5jn6fxjp0rg4g39jeh0hl27vf75 to see that AVAX we sent was deducted from its balance, as well as the transaction fee.